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Transportation Planning

The Transportation Planning Division plans for a safe, efficient and cost-effective multimodal transportation system that is accessible to all residents and visitors, preserves neighborhoods, protects natural resources, promotes economic development and is compatible with and supportive of the City of St. Petersburg's future land use plans.

Services

  • Participation in the ongoing regional transportation planning process established by the Pinellas County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO)
  • Comprehensive Plan updates
  • transit (www.psta.net) and intermodal facility studies
  • transportation demand management programs
  • state and federal grant applications for transportation improvements
  • review of state and federal transportation legislation
  • traffic and parking impact studies for land use changes, rezonings and site plans
  • transportation impact fees.

2016 Parking Demand Study

The City of St. Petersburg commissioned national parking consultant Kimley Horn & Associates to assist in conducting a downtown parking study to evaluate supply versus demand as well as management techniques used for on and off-street parking assets.The study began over the Summer of 2015 and after much public input and evaluation the study was completed in May of 2016. Some of the key findings of the study include:

  • The City should identify public/private partnership opportunities to create additional off-street parking supply. The goal is a few hundred spaces in multiple locations rather than another 1,000+ space garage. An ideal partnership would create additional parking supply for the public while also encouraging desired private investment and development
  • The City should consider providing the first hour free in its major garages during non-event periods and charge more for on-street parking in high demand areas to help balance the on and off-street parking demand
  • Extending the hours of enforcement is appropriate in areas where high on-street demand is present but current regulations cease. For example, some areas of downtown have developed and generated a lot more parking demand but parking turnover is only in effect during the business day.
  • The residential parking permit program should be adjusted because the current program is not sustainable on a long-term basis
  • The EDGE District requires more public and employee parking as it continues to grow in popularity and existing privately owned surface lots are taken out of service due to intensifying development

View the 2016 Parking Demand Study with Appendices.

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